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#10 – Welcome from Henry Shaw

#10 – Welcome from Henry Shaw
8 years, 4 months ago Stop on Spoehrer Plaza Hello, and welcome to the Missouri Botanical Garden. My name is Henry Shaw, and this Garden was my gift to the city of St. Louis over 150 years ago, in fact the locals still refer to it as Shaw’s Garden. Since 1859, millions of ... Stop on Spoe

#11 – How old is this greenhouse?

#11 – How old is this greenhouse?
8 years, 4 months ago Stop at Linnean House busts / Photo of original landscape Although Henry Shaw owned expansive property, he planned the Missouri Botanical Garden for a relatively narrow strip of land stretching north from his country home. A fruticetum, or collection of ... Stop at Li

#12 – How did Henry Shaw use this building?

#12 – How did Henry Shaw use this building?
8 years, 4 months ago Stop at Spink Pavilion / Photo old entrance gate From the start, founder Henry Shaw had planned for his garden to be a place of public enjoyment. In March of 1859, the Missouri legislature passed the official charter, and on June 15, 1859, the Missouri ... Stop at Spi

#13 – Why did Henry Shaw name the house Tower Grove?

#13 – Why did Henry Shaw name the house Tower Grove?
8 years, 4 months ago Stop at Sassafras grove / photo original look of TGH The land that is known today as the Missouri Botanical Garden was discovered by Shaw as he explored the territory surrounding the city of St. Louis. It was a wide and seemingly endless expanse of tall- ... Stop at Sa

#14 – What was this building used for?

#14 – What was this building used for?
8 years, 4 months ago Stop at Museum Building In 1856, as Henry Shaw embarked on the creation of his garden, he sought the guidance of Sir William Jackson Hooker, the director of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. Shaw wrote to Hooker about his property, about the extremes of ... Stop at Mu

#15 – Who is this woman?

#15 – Who is this woman?
8 years, 4 months ago Stop at Temple of Victory In typical Victorian fashion, Missouri Botanical Garden founder Henry Shaw arranged for his mausoleum long before his death. In 1862 he constructed a mausoleum out of Missouri limestone and placed the structure in a grove of ... Stop at Templ

#16 – Who lies here?

#16 – Who lies here?
8 years, 4 months ago Stop at Mausoleum / photo posing for sarcophagus Shaw commissioned George I. Barnett for this octagonal mausoleum made of granite, complete with a domed copper roof and cross on top. The stained glass is of particular note, being of exceptional quality. ... Stop at Ma

#17 – Who am I?

#17 – Who am I?
8 years, 4 months ago Stop at Henry’s statue in front of Tower Grove House / Photo of younger Shaw Well, hello again! This is a statue of me, Henry Shaw. I was born on July 24, 1800 in Sheffield, England. I received my education in Sheffield, and then at the Mill Hill School ... Stop at

#18 –What was “The Grand Tour” that Henry Shaw took during ...

#18 –What was “The Grand Tour” that Henry Shaw took during his lifetime?
8 years, 4 months ago Stop at Victorian Garden / photo of the parterre Sheffield-native Henry Shaw called St. Louis home, but throughout his life he remained a proper Englishman at heart. In the 19th century, no English gentleman’s education was considered complete until he ... Stop at V

#19 – Did Henry Shaw live here?

#19 – Did Henry Shaw live here?
8 years, 4 months ago Stop at Administration Building / photo of residence downtown Garden founder Henry Shaw’s Town House was originally located on the southwest corner of Seventh and Locust streets in downtown St. Louis. Built in 1849, the three-story, traditional residence ... Stop at